Today Show: Unexpected Uses For Everyday Items & Do Therapy Apps Work?

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Today Show: Unexpected Uses For Everyday Items

Making good on their promise from yesterday, the anchors of Today showed off some tips that fans came up with and sent in. Is it weird that the fan ideas were light years better than Today’s ideas? Not a single coffee filter in sight!

So first, someone had the amazing idea of using a carabiner to carry groceries. Don’t you hate it when you try to carry six bags at once and you lose all circulation to your fingers? Natalie Morales showed off clipping a bunch of paper bags together with the carabiner and carrying them with it. It’s an amazing idea that I think I’m going to start doing right away.

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Today Show: Unexpected Uses For Everyday Items & Do Therapy Apps Work?

I know it’s tempting to use the therapy apps in the place of a psychiatrist (just like it’s tempting to use WebMD to replace a doctor) but psychiatrist Gail Saltz said that the apps are better as a supplement to therapy than as a replacement.

Next up was hanging a rake end on the wall to hold your mugs. I’m not convinced of this one, but it did look kind of cool if you’re the going for that rustic old time-y look in your kitchen. Then, there’s using straws to separate your necklaces, instead of letting them tangle into a super chain ball at the bottom of your jewelry box. You just shoot them down the straw.

Natalie Morales had another tip. She said if you have a red flaring blemish on your face, just crush up an aspirin really well and mix it with water into a paste. Then, press the mixture onto your face and let it work overnight. In the morning, it’ll look great. The inflammation and the redness will go down. Natalie Morales said that dermatologists may not recommend it, but it works. It’s certainly better than the egg shell plan from yesterday.

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How Well Do Therapy Apps Work?

There are a lot of therapy apps out there, promising to help you with everything from monitoring moods to repairing relationships. But do they work? Psychiatrist Gail Saltz and a technology reporter named Natali Morris weighed in. Gail Saltz said she thought these apps raise the awareness of symptoms and may work for people with mild conditions. But for more moderate conditions, it is no substitute for professional care. But more and more doctors are using these with their patients to get them engaged with their treatment. Gail Saltz also said that in cognitive therapy, they ask people to write down their moods throughout the day, so they’re able to see they weren’t sad or depressed the whole day. In that way, these apps can really help people.

Natali Morris said that this trend is part of a growing umbrella trend in America where people are using modern technology to monitor every part of themselves in order to improve. That’s why you see people wearing calorie counters, heart rate monitors and pedometers. People are using these technologies to track their progress in order to improve. This movement is called the “quantifying self” trend and therapy apps are no different.

One example of this “quantifying self” trend is the Mood Panda app, which allows you to track your moods over time. You can go into your app and tell the app exactly how you’re feeling and even give a reason. You can then share it over your social networks. Natali Morris said that if you see your boss is really unhappy today, you can then try to avoid him if you need to.

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