Today Show: Avoid Social Media Spoilers & Statue of Limitations on TV

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Today Show: How to Avoid Spoilers

Social media has literally changed how we watch television. If you miss an episode of your favorite show, don’t talk with anyone, don’t use Facebook, stay off Twitter and you might even want to avoid the entire internet all together until you have caught up on the latest episode. And if you do go on the internet, don’t be mad if you see a spoiler.

Americans have gone from sitting around the television as a family watching the latest episode of a show to chiding themselves for missing an episode of their favorite show and forcing themselves to hide from all the spoilers on the internet. Although spoilers have been harder to get away from as technology gets better, even Jerry Seinfeld had the problem in a Seinfeld episode from the earlier years of the show.

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Today Show: Avoid Social Media Spoilers & Statue of Limitations on TV

The Today Show went over the best ways to avoid spoilers on social media, discussed whose fault the spoiler is and talked about the statue of limitations on TV.

But whose fault are the spoilers? Is it the spoiler or the spoilee? Slate senior editor Dan Kois said if you care about a show enough then you should watch the show when it airs. And if you miss the episode for some reason, then he advised staying off the internet.

“If you can’t watch the show, it’s incumbent upon you to stay off Twitter, stay off the Internet and don’t talk to your friends who watch the show,” Kois said.

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Today Show: Spoiler Alert Statue Of Limitations

Kois also said there is a statue of limitations on spoiler alerts. For example, if you say Omar died on The Wire, someone might get upset saying they just started watching the show, even though it aired around 2002. Kois didn’t say how long after someone should be allowed to freely mention spoilers without adding the preemptive “spoiler alert” message.

How long after do you think someone is allowed to freely discuss television shows without having to add a spoiler alert message before they start talking? I think after the next episode of the show has aired you can talk about the previous episode as much as you want.

Even further, is it okay to spoil movies that have been out for a long time? Can you say who Bruce Willis really is in the Sixth Sense? Can you tell someone what Rosebud means? How about Kaiser Soze? Can we tell someone who that is now that the movie has been out for a long time? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

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