Today Show: Advice: How To Change Your Reputation

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Today Show: Hoda’s Playlist

Hoda’s playlist for this Thursday: The Emotion’s “Best of My Love”, off of their CD “Rejoice”. As usual, both Kathie Lee and Hoda got into the song and danced in their seats to the beat. I’m usually not a big fan of her weekly selections, but this song was a great choice!

Today Show: Changing Your Reputation

Today Show: How to Change Your Reputation

Today Show: How to Change Your Reputation

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Leslie Jane Seymour of More Magazine and Dr. Janet Taylor dropped by the set of The Today Show to share Advice on How To Change Your Reputation with co-hosts Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb.

While bad reputations are always harmful, they can be most damaging in the workplace. It can cost you a raise, promotions, or worst case – get you fired. It’s best to take mature steps to get to the root of the problem and communicate with people who have the preconceived notions of your behavior. The first step: look at the situation through their eyes. Are you doing something that would make them feel that way? Often times an easy solution exists to the problem. Look for miscommunication or other simple issues that can make what seems like an overblown problem into something easily remedied with a few simple steps or kind gestures.

Soft Confrontation

Both experts say you can change your reputation by using soft confrontation, Something along the lines of: “look, I see there’s a problem, we need to get it out in the open”. If people think you’re a slut or another derogatory label, you have to confront them and talk about what’s happening, but you also need to know yourself and what behavior you’re doing to make people think that. On the  other hand, if people think you’re “tooting your own horn” or acting above your pay grade, the root of the problem is the same — you’re either doing something to make them feel that way or there is a lack of communication that needs to be remedied. Negative feedback is one thing, but we should also be aware of how people legitimately think about us — especially in terms of family or the workplace. Positive reputations can be a good thing but may also lead to jealousy and other friction within the workplace.

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Typically, most people tend to be defensive and aren’t ready to hear what the real issue is. Reputations can really affect someone, the experts said, and the first step is to figure out the truth and fix it in small steps — you can’t do it overnight. Most of the advice centered around the workplace, but I feel like the same advice can hold true for other situations as well. What do you think? Leave your comments below.

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