The Revolution: Women Vs Men Heart Disease & National Wear Red Day

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The Revolution: Wear Red Day

The Revolution Hosts and audience all wore red for National Wear Red Day, a day to raise awareness for Heart Disease, the #1 killer of women worldwide. Tim Gunn even wore red socks. Dr. Jennifer Ashton said weight is a big risk factor for Heart Disease.

The Revolution: Women & Heart Disease

Heart Disease kills more US women than all types of cancer combined.

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The Revolution: Women’s Heart Disease Vs Cancer

Dr. Jennifer Ashton said the human heart is the size of your fist, weighing an average of 7 to 15 ounces. Your body has 60,000 miles of blood vessels, and your heart beats 100,000 times a day, for a lifetime average of 2.5 billion heartbeats.

More women die of heart disease than all types of cancer combined. Heart Disease risk factors include things like Family Medical History, High Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol. You have different risks as you go through life.

Heart Risk Factors: Women In 30s

Michelle is in her 30s and she doesn’t give much thought to her heart. Obesity, Diabetes, and lack of physical activity can all be contributing factors.

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The Revolution TV: Pregnancy Heart Risks

Pregnancy causes the heart to work overtime, increasing blood volume by 50%. Complications like Preeclampsia, Gestational Diabetes, and Pre-Term Labor can be an early warning sign of Heart Disease.

The Revolution: Smoking & The Pill

Women in their 30s need to worry about smoking and the pill. Smoking While On Birth Control can cause you to develop dangerous blood clots. Quitting Smoking altogether reduces the risk of heart disease by over 50%.

The Revolution: 120 / 80 Ideal Blood Pressure

Dr. Jennifer recommends that in your 30s, you start paying attention to you cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar. The optimal blood pressure is 120/80. It’s much better to be under those number than over them.

Heart Risk Factors: Women In 40s

Annette is in her 40s, and Dr. Jennifer said that 90% of women have at least one Heart Disease risk factor they can influence by changing their behavior. In your 40s, you want to pay attention to weight gain around your waist. This is pretty common, but dangerous Visceral Belly Fat can raise your Cholesterol.

Dr. Jennifer demonstrated how blood has trouble getting through the arteries when plaque builds up on arterial walls. If plaque dislodges, it can form a clot and cause a heart attack.

The Revolution: Heart Disease in African American Women

African American women are at a higher risk of Heart Disease and death after a heart attack. Dr. Jennifer recommended working on the factors you do have control over.

Heart Disease In 50s

Sharon is a Heart Attack survivor, and women over age 55 have an increased risk of Heart Disease. She had arm pains, but didn’t go to the hospital right away because she didn’t believe she was at risk.

Women Vs Men Heart Attack Symptoms

Dr. Jennifer said women have different warning signs compared to men, and symptoms like fatigue and shortness of breath are sometimes mistaken for the flu. Women need to know their and pay attention to their symptoms.

Treatment has the best chance of working if it’s administered within an hour of your cardiac event. Sharon found out her blood pressure wasn’t properly treated, but now she has it under control.

Dr. Jennifer Ashton: Your Body Beautiful Book Review

Dr. Jennifer Ashton has a new book for women who want medical advice on staying healthy throughout life. It’s called Your Body Beautiful: Clockstopping Secrets To Staying Healthy Strong, and Sexy in Your 30s, 40s, and Beyond.

The studio audience received free copies of the book. Click here to purchase Your Body Beautiful for yourself or a woman you think might enjoy it.

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