Drs: Glutathione, DIY Skin Lightener + Patient Texting Therapist?

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The Doctors: DIY Kit For Lighter Skin?

The Doctors wanted to take a closer look at glutathione, which some are saying could brighten your complexion. It’s often used as a cancer treatment and now a large variety of glutathione products can be bought online, with some calling them “magic potions.” Users are instructed to inject glutathione into their own skin and the FDA has issued a warning against skin-lightening injectable products, saying they could lead to disease, infection, or serious injury. So are these injections a disaster waiting to happen?

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Dr Sonia Batra joined The Doctors, explaining that glutathione is a powerful antioxidant found in the body. It lightens the skin by blocking the enzyme that allows you to “lay down pigment.” Because it’s so powerful, it “quenches the free radicals and damage caused by UV and the sun that would otherwise trigger pigment production. Because of the way it works, when you inject it, it can lighten your skin. The problem is that when you buy the DIY kits online, they could be counterfeit, contaminated, or loaded with infection. Plus, people aren’t trained to inject themselves properly.

Drs: Glutathione, DIY Skin Lightener + Patient Texting Therapist?

The Doctors discussed concerns over a popular DIY kit many are using in hopes of lightening their skin. (qubodup / Flickr)

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The Doctors: Medical Uses For Glutathione

Dr Batra explained that it’s already being recommended off label as a dietary supplement, so you can get it safely in the U.S. that way. It’s also recommended for malasma, which is a pigment disorder. The oral forms aren’t as well absorbed as the IV forms, but there is no “cream” that would work. The effects aren’t super dramatic, but there is a noticeable difference, although the effects are temporary.

The Doctors: Patients Texting Therapists?

The Doctors then moved on to take a closer look at the debate over whether patients should be able to text with their therapists outside of therapy. When The Doctors asked their Facebook followers, 63% said yes and 37% said no. Dr Andrew Ordon pointed out that it’s a little different with a doctor and a patient, who may ask about medication or another question that can be answered with just one text, whereas patients with a therapist may need a full dialogue. Dr Rachael Ross actually gave out her number to patients in the beginning, only to regret it, saying there needed to be boundaries. Dr Travis Stork added that no person can commit 24/7 to providing care without going crazy.

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