The Doctors: Are Expensive Beauty Skin Creams Really Better?

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The Drs: Are Expensive Creams Really Better?

The Doctors: Are Expensive Beauty Skin Creams Really Better?

The Doctors shared whether paying more for skin creams really means you’re getting a better product. (AlenD / Shutterstock.com)

The Doctors wanted to put some expensive skin screams to the test to find out if paying more for a product means you’ll get a better result. Leslie, one of the producers for the show, shared that women spend an average of $15,000 on beauty products over a lifetime.

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They narrowed it down to two different products that claim to instantly firm your skin and erase wrinkles, which are what a lot of people using Botox or filler injections for. The first product was just $40, while the second product was $700! She had three women test the products out for themselves.

The Drs: Expensive Skin Creams Put To The Test

They showed a side-by-side comparison of the two products on the first woman and I thought the $700 did a better job reducing the woman’s under-eye bags and drooping eyelids, but she said she would pick the $40 one because it felt better to her.

The second woman then tried the two products. After putting on the second one, she said it made her feel like she didn’t want to talk, so she went with product number one, although I thought the same thing as before. It appears as if the second product, the expensive one, worked better. The third woman preferred the cheaper product as well, comparing it to Spanx, but I didn’t notice much of a difference for her.

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The Drs: Cost Of Beauty Products

Bryan Barron, co-author of The Original Beauty Bible, said it’s been shown time and time again that expensive doesn’t mean better. Bryan said you should make sure that the ingredients are packaged so that they’re not exposed to light and air on a regular basis. He said some of the ingredients, like those in a jar, won’t last. Dr Travis Stork said a lot of times you’re paying for the packaging, which doesn’t necessarily equate to a product working better.

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