The Doctors: Overcome Social Anxiety + Harmless Skin Bumps

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The Doctors: 20-Year-Old With Social Anxiety

Morgan, a 20-year-old woman, claims that social anxiety is ruining her life, so she turned to The Doctors for help. Morgan shared that she was diagnosed with a social and non-verbal disorder. She gets nervous in public or talking to people, and has a hard time understanding what’s going on around her. She can feel the anxiety coming because her heart will start to race and her hands will start to sweat. People don’t understand her condition and think she’s just making it up. She a lot of time stays at home, and her mom Sylvia struggles to see her daughter hiding away.

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Morgan shared that when she was 7-years-old, she had someone come into her life who was verbally abusive and would talk down to her. When she told her mom what was going on, her mom was actually surprised and tried to help her move forward, but Morgan only feels like she’s getting worse.

The Doctors: Overcome Social Anxiety + Harmless Skin Bumps

The Doctors brought back expert Gary Coxe to help a young woman overcome her social anxiety. (porsche-linn / Flickr)

Author and behavioral expert Gary Coxe joined the show, as well as Morgan and her mother. Gary said Morgan’s case was actually pretty severe because she couldn’t do anything considered “normal” so it was taking over her life.

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The Doctors: Overcoming Social Anxiety

Gary explained that when he spoke with Morgan alone, she was totally normal, which means there’s something going on in her mind that causes all her symptoms and anxiety. He wanted to rewire her brain and transform her thinking. Incredibly, he was able to do just that. He took her to a grocery store and then sat down with her to see if she could overcome her anxiety. Her overall anxiety level during the trip never reached more than a five out of ten and got better as she went along.

Morgan said she felt so much more confident after the experience and felt like she had a brand new outlook on life. She hopes that her story can inspire others to get help and know that things can get better. She’s excited about getting out more, getting a job, and hanging out with her friends more. Sylvia was brought to tears she was so thrilled with the results.

Morgan no longer believed she had a disorder, and learned to lead her feelings rather than being a slave to them. If you’re living with social anxiety, or anxiety of any sort, do you believe you can change the way you think and feel?

The Doctors: Dermatofibromas

The Doctors then moved on to help viewers take a closer look at some of the mysterious lumps and bumps on their skin. To help, Dr Sonia Batra joined the show, first looking raised skin bumps that can sometimes be a little itchy, called dermatofibromas. They’re similar to keloid scars but they go under the skin and tether it down. They’re common on the legs and often occur after a minor injury. They’re not dangerous so you really don’t have to do anything to them as long as they don’t change.

The Doctors: Seborrheic Keratosis + Cherry Angiomas

Next, Dr Batra looked at a cluster of moles called Seborrheic Keratosis which can occur anywhere. They almost look and feel like warts but they’re safe. You can have your dermatologist freeze them off if you want, but they tend to be stubborn and come back.

Dr Batra also looked at bright red bumps called cherry angiomas, which are clusters of blood vessels. They’re often inherited and can occur in pregnant women. They’re totally safe and nothing to worry about but if you dislike them, they can be lasered and removed. Intradermal Nevi are moles that become raised and take on a fleshy-pink color. They can get larger over time, and as long as it’s unform in size, you can leave it be!

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