The Doctors: Are Scabies Dangerous? Treatment & Prevention

The Doctors: What Are Scabies?

Children are often at risk for bringing something extra special home from school, such as Chicken Pox, Lice, or even Cold and Flu. But there’s renewed concern and health warnings about a very contagious but treatable skin condition that’s been making the rounds once again: Scabies. Do you know what they are and what to do about them? Are Scabies Dangerous? The Doctors explained how to treat and prevent scabies.

Are Scabies Dangerous? The Doctors

Kids at schools & playgrounds are especially susceptible to Scabies. But are Scabies dangerous?

Scabies is a highly contagious skin infection that has recently had parents concerned about playgrounds and transmission at schools. “Just thinking about Scabies makes you start to itch,” Dr Jim Sears said of the highly contagious problem. The Doctors were visibly upset by even the thought of the mites crawling around on the body. But there are ways you can deal with them.

Are Scabies Dangerous?

“They like to burrow into your skin,” Dr Jim said. “It causes this red rash,” and the mites can hide to avoid detection and treatment. They aren’t visible to the naked eye, and they’re good at finding crevices or spots to avoid their fate at the hands of prescription treatment. The good news is they will succumb and lose the battle, but only if you seek treatment.

This is something you should take seriously and get treated quickly, because it’s so contagious. If a child has Scabies on his or her hands, put gloves on them and warn others at the doctor’s office when you visit.

How To Treat and Prevent Scabies

Take precautions anytime you go to a doctor’s office, because there are plenty of surfaces where kids can transmit this in the waiting room, or to their siblings or classmates. Be sure to clean and disinfect everything. But rest assured that a prescription cream provides effective treatment for Scabies.

Itching may get worse during treatment as the body reacts to treatment. But the good news is they don’t really cause any serious or lasting health complications. Mostly, the itching, irritation, and contagions can get annoying.

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About the author

Pat Howard is a writer from St. Louis. He was born with a remote control in his hand, and is grateful to finally have a haven at Recapo for his pathological love of daytime television.

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