Ellen: Meryl Streep Iron Lady Review & New York Film Critics Award

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Ellen: Meryl Streep & Brad Pitt

When acclaimed actress Meryl Streep from The Iron Lady walked onstage, it was clear how much Ellen adored her.

“I could just gush,” Ellen said. “I don’t want to talk about anything except how amazing you are.”

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Ellen: Meryl Streep Iron Lady Review

Ellen joked about Meryl Streep's screen kisses and reviews her role as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady. (Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com)

Ellen praised Meryl for her role as Margaret Thatcher in the film The Iron Lady.

“You won the New York Film Critics’ Award a couple of days ago,” Ellen said.

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“Me and Brad Pitt,” Meryl said.

“It’s exciting!” Ellen said.

Ellen: Meryl Streep Iron Lady Award Nominations

Ellen brought up the fact that Meryl has been nominated for numerous different awards and lost. She wondered aloud how many acceptance speeches Meryl must have that she never got to deliver.

“You must have a whole lot to pick from when you go up now,” she said. “There are a lot of people to thank.”

“There are a lot of people to thank,” Meryl said. “Certainly in The Oscars. I’ve lost 14 times.”

“Have you kept the speeches?” Ellen asked.

Meryl joked that she feels bad that so many people were left unthanked since she’s lost so many times.

“Hundreds of names of people who are mad at me that never got mentioned,” she said.

Ellen said that from now on there should be a rule that Meryl wins all of the awards.

“We should just vote for you no matter what,” she said.

“That’s a good rule,” Meryl joked.

Ellen: Meryl Streep Oldest Woman Vogue Cover

Ellen congratulated Meryl for being the oldest woman to ever be on the cover of Vogue magazine. Meryl is 62 years old.

“You are the olden woman on the cover,” Ellen said. “Which is fantastic! I think that’s a really important thing.”

Ellen: Meryl Streep Iron Lady Review

Ellen was amazed at how much Meryl disappeared in her role of Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady.

“How long did it take you to get into makeup for that?” Ellen said.

“The movie takes place in three days of older Margaret Thatcher‘s life,” Meryl said. “It was remarkable how little they had to do for my makeup.”

Ellen laughed and said she doubted that was true. She showed a clip from the film in which Meryl plays Margaret in her 80s. Meryl very believably hobbled through the grocery store as though she were 20 years older than she really is. Ellen asked how she did that so well.

“I think we all have the little girl that we used to be inside of us and we all have the old woman that we’re going to be if we’re lucky,” Meryl said.

Then Meryl tried to demonstrate how she got into the role.

“A lot of the characterization had to do with standing,” Meryl said as she stood up and hunched her back to look like an old woman.

“It was really great to just be 62 at the end of the day,” Meryl said.

“It is just so right on,” Ellen said. “You just disappear. Meryl Streep was gone. You were Margaret Thatcher.”

Ellen: Meryl Streep Women’s History Museum

Ellen said she heard that Meryl didn’t make any money for doing The Iron Lady. Meryl explained that wasn’t entirely true.

“I made a million dollars and I gave it away,” she said. “I gave it to the Women’s History Museum.”

Meryl said that history often overlooks the important contributions that women have made to society. She said a prime example of that was Revolutionary War hero, Deborah Sampson.

Meryl explained that Deborah was the first woman in American history to take a bullet for her country.

“She took two musket balls, which are British bullets, in her side,” she said.

Meryl Streep: Deborah Sampson Revolutionary War

Meryl said that Deborah was taken to the hospital for her injuries. However, the doctors asked to take her pants off so that the bullets could be retrieved from her side. Fearing that her true identity would be found out, Deborah left the hospital and tended to her wounds herself.

“She cut the bullets out and sewed it up,” Meryl said.

Then Deborah moved to Massachusetts, where she married a farmer and had children. She sued the U.S. Government for disability. The government resisted at first, but Deborah‘s friend, Paul Revere intervened and helped Deborah receive a yearly disability of over $40.

Ellen: Meryl Streep Kisses Bruce Willis, Clint Eastwood

Ellen devised a game in which Meryl would be shown a pair of lips belonging to some one that she had kissed during her career and Meryl would have to guess whom they belonged to.

“You’ve kissed a lot of actors over the years and we want to see how well you would recognize just the lips,” Ellen said.

The first set of lips were a man’s and Meryl couldn’t figure out whose they were.

“I have no idea,” she said. “Is that George Clooney?”

“No, that’s Alec Baldwin,” Ellen said.

Meryl recognized the second pair of lips almost immediately.

“Oh that’s Clint!” she said.

“That’s Clint Eastwood,” Ellen said. “That’s right.”

The third pair of lips stumped Meryl until Ellen graciously gave her a hint.

“I just have no idea,” Meryl said.

“You did Death Becomes Her with him,” Ellen said.

“Oh! That’s Bruce Willis!” Meryl said. “I didn’t kiss him though.”

“Well he said you did,” Ellen joked.

Ellen: Meryl Streep Toilet Seat

Ellen mentioned that Meryl has been to numerous award ceremonies.

“Is it the same experience for you every time, or is it different?” she asked.

“Every time I stay in a different hotel, which is really exciting,” Meryl joked.

Meryl said the hotel she was staying in at that time concerned a little.

“When I got up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom, the lid was on the toilet and it wrestled itself away from me and opened itself,” she said. “The seat was warm and soft…Ew…I mean there are a lot of upsetting things.”

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