Dr Oz: Microwave Steamer Bags Safety & Is Plastic Microwave-Safe?

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Dr Oz: Truth About Microwaves

Do you have a Microwave in your kitchen? Is this something to worry about? Dr Oz talked about the presence of these machines at work and at home, as a convenient appliance.

Though it was supposed to make cooking easier, there were fears about Radiation that alarmed consumers. However, Radiation concerns have proven to be unfounded. Despite this, Microwave sales have been declining for the past decade.

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Dr Oz: How Microwaves Work

Dr Oz: Microwave Steamer Bags Safety & Is Plastic Microwave-Safe?

Dr Oz set the record straight about the use of Microwaves. What should you know about these appliances? Find out what is a myth whether to use plastic. (Maxx-Studio / Shutterstock.com)

Doctor Oz wanted to set the record straight, so he invited a cancer researcher who has studied this topic. Kate Wolin said that she thinks people are concerned about radiation in their food or bodies.

Old data has been debunked, but it may help to know what microwaves do, as well as what they do not do. Microwaves generate short radio waves that vibrate water molecules inside the food, which is what warms it up.

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Dr Oz: Microwave Steamer Bags Safety

Are you concerned about the foods you are putting in your microwave? Kate said that the thing to worry about is plastic, because chemicals from a plastic container could leach into your food.

Since there is no solid data about whether plastics are truly safe, Wolin said her approach is “better safe than sorry.” You can avoid those chemicals by skipping plastic, even in prepackaged foods such as steamer bags.

Dr Oz: Is Plastic Microwave-Safe?

You never know what Microwave-Safe really means, and it is certainly not a guarantee. You may or may not pick up chemicals from those types of plastic bags.

BPA-free is a good way to go, but there are many other chemicals in plastics that we don’t know about. Instead, use a Glass or Ceramic container, covered with a paper towel to prevent splattering.

Dr Oz: Microwave Destroys Food Nutrients?

Do foods lose their cancer-fighting properties when you prepare them in a Microwave? Dr Oz talked with Kate Wolin about this concern, and she said that microwaves could change the nutrient composition differently from other cooking methods.

For example, microwaving Broccoli could destroy 90% of its Vitamin C content. That is still better than many other alternatives. Eating Broccoli raw is great for antioxidant benefits.

But there are other ways to cook, such as steaming, stir-fry, or boiling, that may be better as well, if you don’t want raw broccoli or other vegetables.

Dr Oz: Microwave Tips

Dr Oz said that Broccoli is one of many great foods to eat. Try microwaving for the shortest amount of time possible, and remember to skip those plastic containers.

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Comments

  1. Matt says

    Another common myth that needs debunked is the irrational fear that putting metal in the microwave will blow up your house in a huge Michael Bay type explosion, when in reality although microwaving metal should be avoided, it’s not the worst thing you can do. Many people mistake the blue sparks they see for a power surge, when in reality it’s just plasma arcing, and it won’t blow up a microwave, just create a smell similar to burnt ramen and possibly leave very hard to clean blackened char marks where the metal arced. Here’s what really happens (this video was featured recently in the Huffington Post).

    http://youtu.be/PrVsLT6SuU0?t=1m20s

    If you notice, the fork glowed after awhile which means along with the weird smell and char marks, it may ruin the integrity of the metal object being microwaved. In other words, it’s something best not to do, but the myth of exploding microwaves is something parents tell their children to scare them into not doing it, like the myth that gum stays in your digestive system for seven years.

    Although there is one kind of metal that really can be dangerous to microwave, and that’s magnesium ribbon, although that’s common sense.

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