Dr Oz: Ibuprofen Triples Risk of Stroke & Aspirin Stops Heart Attacks

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Dr Oz: Take Aspirin to Prevent Back Pain

Dr. Oz has been sharing important information all episode about the risks involved with taking too high a dose of acetaminophen on a regular basis. He also gave out a great, all-natural way to treat your headache without taking acetaminophen or getting any of the harmful side effects from the drug.

Dr Oz: Ibuprofen Triples Risk of Stroke

Ibuprofen, found in products like Advil, Motrin, and Midol, may be the first thing you take for any sort of pain but taking it too often could triple your risk for stroke. Dr. Oz said he had always been aware of the risks associated with Ibuprofen and stomach bleeding, but he had no idea there was a connection to strokes as well.

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Dr Oz: Ibuprofen Triples Risk of Stroke & Aspirin Stops Heart Attacks

Dr. Oz explained how Ibuprofen can triple your risk of having a stroke, what alternatives can be taken for pain and the benefits of aspirin for a heart attack.

Dr. Devi Nampiaparampil explained Ibuprofen, when taken over long periods of time, will retain water in your body and lead to high blood pressure. High blood pressure is going to affect the small blood vessels carrying blood to the brain which could increase your risk for stroke and the development of blood clots. She said the maximum daily recommended dose of Ibuprofen is 600 mg and it should not be taken regularly for more than ten days straight. However, Dr. Oz felt no one should be taking the drug for more than three days in a row and if the pain is continuing he suggested finding alternative ways to treat the discomfort.

Dr Oz: High Blood Pressure Due to Ibuprofen

The biggest warning sign that you could be taking too much Ibuprofen is high blood pressure. This could be putting your health, and even your life, at risk. Dr. Nampiaparampil said while many of us only relate high blood pressure to the foods we eat, it can often be caused by the medications we take as well.

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Dr Oz: Treat Pain With Heated Pain Patches

A better option to taking medication may be an alternation of Ibuprofen and heated pain patches. Dr. Oz explained pain patches are safer because they attach to the skin and rather than the medication going into the blood stream, it penetrates through the skin. These patches will help to alleviate your pain without the side effects related to over-the-counter medications.

Dr Oz: Take Aspirin to Prevent Heart Attacks

Dr. Oz says there is on over-the-counter medication that could be the answer to more than you thought possible. Aspirin has been offering medical benefits for many years, such as the ability to help stop at heart attack, and Dr. Oz explained most issues in the body are caused by inflammation, which Aspirin can reduce when taken in the right doses. Here are Dr. Oz’s dosing guidelines for taking Aspirin:

  • Take 325 mg every 4 to 6 hours for back pain or muscle pain
  • Do not give Aspirin to children
  • Do not take more than 4,000 mg per day, which are 12 doses
  • Take 2 low-dose Aspirin a day if you are over 40 to prevent heart attack
  • If you think you are having a heart attack chew 325 mg and absorb it under your tongue so it gets into your system quickly.

Dr Oz Quiz: Health Truths

Dr. Oz wanted to know how much his audience has been learning from his show so he challenged one of his audience members to a little quiz. He gave her three statements and she had to determine which two were true and which one was a lie.

  1. Beets boost your memory – Truth
  2. Ginger regulates your cholesterol – Truth
  3. Mangos help you sleep – Lie
  1. Dr. Oz was born in Delaware – Lie
  2. Dr. Oz played water polo in college – Truth
  3. Dr. Oz worked on a Denzel Washington movie – Truth

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